Pohala Providers stay up to date with Medications and Prescribing

 

Our Pohala Providers strive to remain up to date and educated for both Allopathic/Western Medicine and Integrative/Functional/Natural Medicine.

Today here is Julie Foster FNP and Donna London FNP at the Nurse Practitioner’s of Oregon’s Pharmacology Update. We learned about safety and use of medications for the aging population. Take home: Be careful as even OTC meds are very dangerous and poly-pharmacy leads to more problems than you may think. Combining some medications maylead to dementia, sudden heart attack, kidney failure, and gastro-intestinal bleeding.

Pain meds in elderly reduce cognitive function, respiratory drive and only should be used if absolutely necessary. Topical is a better option many times.

Have you reviewed all medications ,even supplements with with a conscientious medical provider (like us at Pohala, many PCPs are too busy to keep up)?

Taking a pill rarely provides THE answer to your health. Are you looking for a cure or symptoms relief? We keep learning more and more have integrative therapies, like Acupuncture, Massage Therapy, Mind Body techniques like EFT, meditation, prayer, and walking in nature improve many health concerns without all the dangerous side effects of pharmaceuticals.

We aim to use the least amount or none of allopathic pharmaceuticals in our patients. But if we choose to we are experts in prescribing. Safety and Quality of Life is paramount.

Food is medicine, Healthy Lifestyle can heal, and Positive Relationships can reduce Pain. 🏵🎆🏵

Follow up with your health care provider and review your medications.

Call Pohala to review your medications with one of our amazing providers. We still can schedule you in a short time (1day to 1 week), unlike most PCPs 6-8 weeks out for an appointment

(503) 572-4196

The Creatures that Live in Our Bodies from Vera Vos, Family Nurse Practitioner

Vera Voss

by Vera Vos

One of the most fascinating and significant biological discoveries of this century is that we are not alone in our bodies.

Human bodies are made up of approximately 37.2 trillion cells. There is an estimated 100 trillion microorganisms (single celled creatures) that live on and within us, about 3 times more cells than our own bodies! Whole ecosystems of microorganisms live in every part of our body – skin, brain, liver, lungs, etc. The ecosystem that gets most talked about is our gut microbiome (the collection of microorganisms that inhabit our gut), which when all dumped together on a scale weighs about 2 Kg and consists of at least 1,000 species of bacteria, not to mention viruses, fungi, protozoa and archaea. Two thirds of our gut microbiome is unique to us as an individual, like our finger print.

Why is this such a big deal? We still have lots to learn but all the microorganisms in our body and, maybe, especially our gut microbiome have a huge influence on our health. They are major contributors to digestion and largely responsible for extracting nutrients from food. They spearhead the production of certain vitamins like B and K and play a major role in immune function. The surprising thing is how much influence they have on today’s most common disease processes.

Due to changes in our food supply and other factors, certain strains of microorganisms are increasingly common in the human gut and may be associated with weight gain and obesity, cancers, autoimmune disorders, and mental health, especially depression, anxiety and autism.

Considering obesity is associated with increased risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, some cancers, arthritits, and many other chronic diseases, the unique make-up of our own gut microbiome is very significant to our health.

So how do we maximize the health of our gut microbiome, and, coincidentally our own health? Obviously eating a healthy diet is most important. I recommend 70-80% or more of our diet be whole plants – vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds and whole grains. Buying organic, local and seasonal or growing your own is probably best and adding lots of fresh herbs and spices, wild mushrooms and fermented foods creates a favorable gut environment for healthy microbes. There are more non-gluten grains available than ever before and sprouted, organic wheat products may be tolerable for those sensitive to wheat gluten.

If you would like to learn a whole lot more about how our microbiome influences our health and how to cultivate a microbiome that helps us thrive, check out the program below:

Click here to watch a video on how we are interconnected and the power we have to heal from within.

Please call our Pohala office if you would like to make an appointment to talk about gut health.

Vera

Visit Massage Therapist Tiki Jones at Pohala Clinic in Portland, Oregon

“I believe that ever BODY needs a massage!” 

We welcome our new massage therapy practitioner Tiki Jones, LMT to Pohala Clinic. She recently answered our getting to know you questions from the blog:

What led you to the massage profession?

My love of people and wanting to aid in their healing led me to train and become a licensed massage therapist.

What is your goal as a healthcare professional the first time you see a new client?

My goal the first time I see a client is to directly address the issue they have asked me about before going to the area that may not hurt but is most likely compensating for the hurt/injury. For example, someone may say their shoulder hurts and I will work on that area and also on the antagonist muscles.

What is in your life personally that helps you have a better understanding of your clients?

I have a body that I use! From picking up small children, to sitting at a computer to doing sports. I believe every body needs massage. Especially those bodies that give massage need to receive that healing touch as well.

What is your view on western medicine (allopathic)  v. eastern (naturopathic) medicine?

They go hand in hand. I heard a chiropractor once say, (and I’m paraphrasing here) Allopathic is great when your house is on fire; but you wouldn’t call the fire department to douse your house everyday. Naturopathic is great to maintain your house.

What are your hours?

To start with my hours will be Tuesdays 10am to 3pm. They will increase as need picks up.

Call the Pohala Clinic to book a time for a massage with Tiki.

Tiki Staton Jones

Portland Family Nurse Practitioner Vera Vos on Science, Medicine and Spirituality

Vera Voss

Vera Vos, a family nurse practitioner at Pohala Clinic talks about the intersection between spirituality and medicine. 

I am passionate about science. I love how science requires us to be rational and unbiased and I am always amazed how perfect science is, like the symmetry of shapes that repeat themselves in patterns in animals, plants, and the landscape. The language of science is mathematics and when we can figure out the right numbers, so much is explained. At the same time I value my spiritual side. We think that science and spirituality are divergent but most often they come full circle to join each other.

I did a course in mind body medicine at Harvard with Herbert Benson, one of the pioneer researchers to discover the physiological benefits of meditation. Since that time, I have had my own meditation practice. This practice helps me listen better and empathize with others.

I think my love and respect for science coupled with a practice that requires me to stop judging, valuing and, essentially, thinking and just be in the moment helps me gain a deeper understanding of my clients physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Please visit our Pohala Clinic contact page to book an appointment with Dr. Vera Vos.

Getting to Know Lisa Del Alba, a Naturopath in Portland, Oregon

Lisa Del Alba

Our Pohala Clinic practitioners represent a wide variety of experiences and approaches to medicine.   Choosing a naturopath is an important decision. We believe that knowing how a person thinks about health makes a difference in the naturopath and client relationship. We hope you enjoy these thoughts on life and medicine from  Lisa Del Alba:

How do you approach a new client? 

When I see a client for the first time, my hope is, more or less, to get to know them as an individual. Rudolf Steiner once commented that there is as much difference from one human individual to the next as there is among different species of animals! My favorite part of my job is sitting face-to-face with my clients and hearing about their unique lives, and feeling amazement about how incredible it is that there can be so many different ways to live a human life. How do we all do it?  My ideal patient is someone who is interested in learning about their health, and co-working with me towards better health.

 

What led you to a career as a naturopath? 

Starting out my higher education with a combination-type of degree in physics, electrical engineering, and mathematics left me with a propensity to want to think things through. I heard lectures from physicists and mathematicians that left me with a sense of awe and wonder at the workings of the world and the universe. As a young mother, I remember worrying about my children when something unfamiliar would come up health-wise. For example, at one point, one child had persistent diarrhea, and another was chronically constipated. Like a ‘good mom’, I carted them in to see a local pediatrician. His brief explanations and suggestions were unsatisfying and didn’t seem to help anything. So, I started researching on my own.

After months of experiences, wondering, and researching, the questions only led to more questions. The whole process led to a sense of wonder and reverence for how the human being lives in their body, and how we all live in connection with the broader world. The human being was every bit as complex, fascinating and wonderful as I had felt the entire world and universe to be during my university studies! I remember thinking to myself; ‘Wow, this could be a full-time job’. A career change was in the making.

Tell us about your early life: 

I grew up in a household that, in some ways, held fairly conventional beliefs. I am fortunate to have had a supportive and fruitful upbringing with parents who were interested in life and taught and shared their interests. My dad grew up as a cowboy on a Colorado ranch, and was a practicing psychologist who also taught at a local college. My mom founded and directed a pre-school while being a full-time mom who cooked, sewed, knitted, etc. She eventually went back to school, received her doctorate, and worked for the University of Maryland. Both parents loved art, adventure, travel, the outdoors, and human diversity. They eventually went their separate ways, and I became a teenager.

With such a wonderful preparation by my life circumstances and my parents, I then proceeded to make many mistakes! I learned to work my way out of and through many and varied errors along my life path. These life experiences, among others, have deepened my ability to feel understanding for where a client finds themselves in their life situation.

What is your medical philosophy regarding natural medicine and the concept of Eastern and Western medicine? 

My scientific education has trained my thinking capacities, and my interest in the world keeps me learning and open to new possibilities. Anthroposophical spiritual science has provided an indispensable lens for a feeling and understanding which helps towards putting all of these various pieces together

When asked what my views are on ‘eastern’ and ‘western’ medicine, some people are surprised by my answer. In popular culture, many people think of allopathic (conventional or institutionalized) medicine as western, and almost anything else such as ‘alternative’ or naturopathic medicine as ‘eastern’. Actually, this is not a completely accurate picture. I think of ‘eastern’ medicine as medical systems arising out of ancient Eastern cultures – a few examples being Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. The Western world also has its older medical traditions. Naturopathy has its roots in nature-cure practices in old-Europe and the Americas. Anthroposophical medicine has its origins in Central Europe and included an effort to bring ancient Eastern wisdom into the Western culture in a form that could be more understandable for Western constitutions and modes of understanding.

What are your office hours at Pohala? 

I work regularly in Portland at Pohala on Wednesdays from 9-5, and Thursdays from 9-1. (In Eugene, I work 9-5:30 Mondays, Tuesdays, and Fridays, and 2-5:30 on Thursdays.) Occasionally there are temporary changes in my schedule as needs arise.  I am the school doctor at the Eugene Waldorf School, and teach seminars to prospective Waldorf School teachers in the WTEE teacher training program. I find great value in working in a collegial way with teachers and other health care providers.

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Thank you to Lisa Del Alba for her thoughtful answers.  To make an appointment with Dr. Del Alba, please call the Pohala Clinic.