We Accept the Following Insurance Companies at Pohala Clinic 

We know that insurance coverage is very important when you are making health care decisions. We accept a variety of insurance companies at Pohala including Blue Cross Blue Shield, Providence , United Health Care, First Choice Health, MODA  and Pacific Source. We are also willing to work with any other insurance company you may use.
Pohala is committed to providing the best care in functional and natural medicine in the Portland area. We have a variety of specialists including family care, nurse practitioners, naturopaths, psychiatric professionals, acupuncturists and body workers.
We will gladly answer any questions you have about insurance coverage. Feel free to contact Pohala with your questions.
Julie Foster- Nurse Practitioner, Owner

Why did Tyler Mostul become a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner: Becoming Sane in an Insane World

Tyler Mostul

 

Pohala now has Behavioral /Mental Services. So many people are suffering, and at least in Oregon, so many cannot find a mental health practitioner or when they do they do not align with their values.   Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Tyler Mostul is unlike most in that he has an unique perspective and aims to focus more on therapy, holistic approaches as opposed to pharmaceuticals. When warranted Tyler Mostul PMHNP has the expertise to prescribe pharmaceuticals and does so, thoughtfully.

His original interest in psychiatry grew out of his experience volunteering for a year with the homeless in Los Angeles, California.  After he graduated with his Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a minor in Theology, he developed an interest in learning how a person comes to be in a place where they did not have a house to live in.  At that time, this was not a situation that he or anyone close to him had ever had to deal with. He figured there was no better way to learn than to LISTEN  to those who found themselves experiencing homelessness directly.

During his time in L.A., he was present in the lives of those who were some of the most oppressed in our society.  He witnessed these people grossly mistreated by police, paramedics, and other social service providers.  He listened to horror stories of what people go through to survive.  He realized that mental health and substance abuse are two of the largest personal barriers to people improving their lives, and he saw firsthand that the way society at large chooses to deal with these things does not work very well.  In fact, the places people are told to go for help often cause more harm than good. This awakened a passion inside of him to attempt to help people deal with their problems in a way that causes them the least amount of distress as possible.  

This experience and others for him solidified the belief that there are always significant psychological, social, and environmental factors that contribute to a person’s mental health.  Whether a person lacks enough money to pay for their basic needs or has plenty of money, there will always be significant psychological, social, and/or environmental factors involved.  This concept heavily influences his practice today.

Psychiatry attempts to say that a person’s mental health struggles are due to there being something wrong with their brain.  First of all, this is a theory that even psychiatry acknowledges is a theory and not fact, yet many mental health providers promote this theory as fact.  The theory that mental health challenges are caused by there being something wrong with the brain never made sense to Tyler as he saw there were endless things going on in a person’s life that could easily explain why a person would be depressed, anxious, or addicted to something.  Not only is there no brain scan, blood test, genetic test, or other objective test mental health professionals use to diagnose mental health conditions,  Later he learned that the evidence does not support the brain-based theory of psychological distress either.  

Tyler Mostul PMHNP does not see depression, anxiety, mania, addiction, hearing voices, or seeing visions as some kind of brain disease or as “insane.” Instead he sees them as sane ways of relating to and coping with a person’s often insane world.  Acknowledging this has the potential to provide some relief as we open up to being more gentle and compassionate with ourselves. Discovering new ways of relating to our insane world also has this potential. He hopes to explore these possibilities with his clients.

Tyler Mostul PMHNP is accepting new patients. Call Pohala for an appointment today (503) 572-4196

 

The Courage to Heal with Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster

Last night met by my endearing Anthroposophic colleagues 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️ who travelled to stay with me, then to wake up at 4am and travel to New York for a week of training.

One theme is to discuss the Courage 🦁 to Heal. I think it relates to…

1. What does it mean as a Healer to show up for a person to invite a space for healing to happen?

2. How can patients too have the Courage to stand in the face of anything and be brave enough to Heal?

What healing means to one person can mean something else to another. 🌸

We will cover topics for women’s health, chronic illness, and one of my favorite teachings on the Alchemy of the 7 Sacred Metals for healing. All of this in the context of holistic medicine.

Did you know that the word Anthroposophy means Human in Divine Wisdom? And furthermore the Divine Sophia (Feminine) Wisdom. Why does that matter? When we can know ourselves and be guided in such a higher force of Divine Wisdom then we may become or see our full human potential.

Anthroposophy gives me a lens to view the cosmos and all its facets for healing. We focus on what makes us healthy (salutogenesis). Out of this true healing is possible. My practice is guided in part by these approaches.

🌈🔱

– Julie Foster

 

Genetic and Neurotransmitter Mental Health Testing in Portland, Oregon by Julie Foster

Should I have Genetic or Neurotransmitter testing for psychiatric or mental health medications?

As a healthcare professional it is always my goal to carefully determine what medications work with specific patients. My clients who have depression, anxiety, bipolar, or schizophrenia all have different medication needs. Genetic testing give me another tool to get the medications right from the beginning.

Whether you have a new mental health diagnosis or a chronic mental health condition, testing for  the genetic predispositions for medications and knowing neurotransmitter levels is incredibly helpful when making a decision about medications.

Pohala offers genetic and neurotransmitter testing for mental health to all patients who request the process.

Many insurances are now covering this testing.

We offer testing from companies such as Admera, Genesight, and ZRT.

Let’s get to the bottom of your healthcare needs!

Julie Foster FNP

 

What is Epigenetics Theory?

Pohala Client Julie A. Fast answers the question: What is Epigenetics Theory? in her article for Health Central.com.

Article excerpt:

Genetics is the study of heredity and the variation of inherited characteristics. Epigenetics is the study of how the environment around us and the choices we make can change the expression of inherited genes and whether these changes in gene regulation can then passed to a child. Richard C. Francis, the author of Epigenetics: How Environment Shapes Our Genes notes, “Social interactions are a particularly important source of gene regulation.” Think of the possibilities!

An Example of Epigenetic Theory from Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar is considered a genetic illness. Two children, raised in the same environment have a grandfather with bipolar. One child has naturally expressed bipolar mania at age 17 with no substance use. The other child who lives with depression, but no mania takes an SSRI antidepressant at age 28. She has her fist mania three weeks later and now has a bipolar diagnosis. Her substance-induced mania is considered an epigenetic change causing a latent gene to switch on. Epigenetic theory asks, “Can the switched-on quality of this gene then be passed to a child?”

What is the Epigenome?

Epigenetic changes do not affect our DNA (genome), but instead influence the expression of genes through changes in the epigenome, a set of chemical compounds that tells our genes what to do including switching genes on or off and controlling the production of proteins in particular cells. R. Francis calls this epigenome the director of a play while our genes are the actors. The epigenome represents the nurture side of the nature vs. nurture debate. If we learn to control our epigenome, can we direct the expression of genes for better health?

Click here to read the rest of the What is Epigenetics Theory? article from Julie A. Fast.

 

Acupuncture and Chronic Pain Management by Paresh Shelat Naturopath and Licensed Acupuncturist

Paresh Shelat

Need help for chronic pain in Portland, Oregon? At Pohala Clinic, we offer a variety of natural pain relief options with an emphasis on the pain relief benefits of acupuncture.

Did you know that Acupuncture can help alleviate pain from both acute and chronic conditions? Furthermore, Acupuncture continues to prove beneficial on a multitude of levels from physical ailments such as low back pain, neck pain, arthritis, etc. to mental and emotional ailments, such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse, etc).

Please take a moment to read the PubMed article discussing Acupuncture and Morphine in the management of acute pain in the emergency department.

‘This article provides an update on one of the oldest pain relief techniques (acupuncture) that could find a central place in the management of acute care settings. This should be considered especially in today’s increasingly complicated and polymedicated patients to avoid adverse drug reactions.’

Acupuncture vs intravenous morphine in the management of acute pain in the ED.

If you would like help decreasing acute or chronic pain through natural and lifestyle based approaches, please schedule an appointment with Dr. Paresh Shelat.

Call Pohala Clinic (503) 572-4196

 

Help for Sleep When You Have Bipolar Disorder

Pohala Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster is often asked for quotes regarding her mental health work. Julie was interviewed for the following Health Central slide show on getting better sleep when you have bipolar disorder.

From the article:

Bipolar disorder responds well to a sleep plan that respects the body’s circadian rhythm. Learning to prevent mood swings by making good “sleep hygiene” choices is an inexpensive and natural way to prevent mania and depression. Sleep changes are not always easy in our very busy world, but please know that making even a few of the changes discussed here can reduce the need for certain medications and ultimately prevent mood swings.

Click here to read 9 Tips to Help Sleep With Bipolar. 

Mahalo,

Team Pohala

 

Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder and Cannabis: An Interview with Portland Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster

Julie Foster, nurse practitioner at Pohala Clinic in Portland, Oregon was recently interviewed by writer Lisa Ellis for PsyCom.net on the topic of medical marijuana, psychosis and schizophrenia. As more states and countries legalize cannabis, it’s essential that all sides of the marijuana story are told. What helps many can also cause unwanted and difficult to mange symptoms in others.  Julie addresses this topic in the article Medical Marijuana for Schizophrenia: Weighing the Risks and Benefits. 

Article excerpt:

“As medical marijuana becomes legal in more states, experts fear it will be used to treat more conditions although data is lacking and health could be harmed. But when it comes to schizophrenia, is cannabis safe, even if it is “medical”?

A growing number of people today are turning to medical marijuana (also called medical cannabis) to manage a host of health problems. But for those with schizophrenia,  a chronic brain disorder that causes periods of psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, and trouble focusing, marijuana—in any form—can actually worsen the symptoms, according to Julie Foster, a family nurse practitioner who also serves as Medical Director of Pohala Clinic, a center for integrative care and alternative medicine approaches located in Portland, Oregon.

That’s why she and many other experts recommend that people with schizophrenia or a tendency toward psychosis steer clear of all forms of marijuana.

What is Marijuana?

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Thank you,

Pohala Team

Julie Foster Nurse Practitioner in Portland, Oregon Accepting Clients with Bipolar Disorder

Julie Foster has over 20 years of experience working with people who have a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. She also works with clients who are not sure if there is bipolar or if it is simply depression or anxiety.
Do you wonder: Do I Have Bipolar Disorder? 
Julie’s appointments allow for time to explore your history in order to come to a decision on what management plan will work best in your current situation. It can be a bit scary at first to think that you have a mental health disorder. Julie provides a safe environment where you can explore symptoms and come up with an answer.
Partners and Family Members are Welcome
Julie also encourages partners and family members to attend appointments so that their questions and needs can be  heard. Pohala encourages a family approach to stabilizing the mood, but as Julie makes very clear when asked about the role of family, your family is comprised of the people you choose to have in your life. They may be relatives or it may be you have found a family that is not related to your family of origin that supports your beliefs in life in order so that you can stay healthy.
How do you Help a Person Who Asks Do I Have Bipolar Disorder
Julie Foster describes her approach:
When I meet a new client who thinks bipolar disorder is in the family, I look at the whole person first. What is happening in the person’s life?  What is going on in the person’s relationships? What substances is the person using that could lead to symptoms that look like the symptoms of bipolar disorder?
It’s a very important time when someone comes to see me about mood swings It means that either they or someone close by has said,  “I think you have bipolar disorder!”  This is life changing and I  want to make sure I’m present and open to what the person is feeling.
I then ask questions about sleep, nutrition, relationships and life events.  I look at bipolar disorder as an opportunity to help the whole person. When we figure out what is going on with the mood and come up with the time of onset and the family history, it’s easier to figure out if bipolar is the actual diagnosis. From there, I explain my philosophy of the illness, listen to what the client feels is happening and come up with a plan that addresses the mind and the body.
I definitely use traditional psychiatric medications as needed, but I also supplement this treatment with natural treatments including homeopathic and herbal remedies. I am a careful study and make sure that what I recommend will not make my client more manic or depressed.
Please know that I have lived with bipolar disorder in my own family for all of my life and I’m very careful to make sure the treatments I suggest will keep a person well and not add more stress to a person’s life. I’m also open to any discussion of spiritual experiences and how there are many different approaches to mental health treatment around the world.
Please call Julie today to book a session and finally get the answers you need:
Do I have bipolar disorder?
What is the best treatment plan for the illness?
What help do I need?
How can I involve my family or partner?
And most importantly…
Am I going to be ok?
If you are a family member, Julie can work with you to get the best care possible for a loved one with bipolar disorder.
Julie’s approach is gentle and firm, based in sound medical practices that incorporate spiritual modalities. Give Julie a call today and book a session. It’s a good time to finally get help and start yourself on the road to stability.
What Julie’s clients say about her bipolar disorder work:
Julie Foster has been my prescriber and advocate for over ten years. I already knew that I had bipolar disorder when she took me on as a patient. I had written a few books and had a pretty good handle on how to manage the illness, but I often had problems with medications and wanted to know what non western treatments she could add to my regular plan. Julie is so compassionate. She understands bipolar as she lives with it in her own family. She is someone I can turn to when I feel overwhelmed with the the enormity of having this illness. She has helped greatly with my never ending sleep problems and I know I can call her at any time when I have a question. I highly recommend Julie as a prescriber and most importantly, as an overall provider for all of the problems many of us with bipolar disorder face including issues with our physical health. 
Julie A. Fast

Portland Family Nurse Practitioner Vera Vos on Science, Medicine and Spirituality

Vera Voss

Vera Vos, a family nurse practitioner at Pohala Clinic talks about the intersection between spirituality and medicine. 

I am passionate about science. I love how science requires us to be rational and unbiased and I am always amazed how perfect science is, like the symmetry of shapes that repeat themselves in patterns in animals, plants, and the landscape. The language of science is mathematics and when we can figure out the right numbers, so much is explained. At the same time I value my spiritual side. We think that science and spirituality are divergent but most often they come full circle to join each other.

I did a course in mind body medicine at Harvard with Herbert Benson, one of the pioneer researchers to discover the physiological benefits of meditation. Since that time, I have had my own meditation practice. This practice helps me listen better and empathize with others.

I think my love and respect for science coupled with a practice that requires me to stop judging, valuing and, essentially, thinking and just be in the moment helps me gain a deeper understanding of my clients physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Please visit our Pohala Clinic contact page to book an appointment with Dr. Vera Vos.