Why did Tyler Mostul become a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner: Becoming Sane in an Insane World

Tyler Mostul

 

Pohala now has Behavioral /Mental Services. So many people are suffering, and at least in Oregon, so many cannot find a mental health practitioner or when they do they do not align with their values.   Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Tyler Mostul is unlike most in that he has an unique perspective and aims to focus more on therapy, holistic approaches as opposed to pharmaceuticals. When warranted Tyler Mostul PMHNP has the expertise to prescribe pharmaceuticals and does so, thoughtfully.

His original interest in psychiatry grew out of his experience volunteering for a year with the homeless in Los Angeles, California.  After he graduated with his Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a minor in Theology, he developed an interest in learning how a person comes to be in a place where they did not have a house to live in.  At that time, this was not a situation that he or anyone close to him had ever had to deal with. He figured there was no better way to learn than to LISTEN  to those who found themselves experiencing homelessness directly.

During his time in L.A., he was present in the lives of those who were some of the most oppressed in our society.  He witnessed these people grossly mistreated by police, paramedics, and other social service providers.  He listened to horror stories of what people go through to survive.  He realized that mental health and substance abuse are two of the largest personal barriers to people improving their lives, and he saw firsthand that the way society at large chooses to deal with these things does not work very well.  In fact, the places people are told to go for help often cause more harm than good. This awakened a passion inside of him to attempt to help people deal with their problems in a way that causes them the least amount of distress as possible.  

This experience and others for him solidified the belief that there are always significant psychological, social, and environmental factors that contribute to a person’s mental health.  Whether a person lacks enough money to pay for their basic needs or has plenty of money, there will always be significant psychological, social, and/or environmental factors involved.  This concept heavily influences his practice today.

Psychiatry attempts to say that a person’s mental health struggles are due to there being something wrong with their brain.  First of all, this is a theory that even psychiatry acknowledges is a theory and not fact, yet many mental health providers promote this theory as fact.  The theory that mental health challenges are caused by there being something wrong with the brain never made sense to Tyler as he saw there were endless things going on in a person’s life that could easily explain why a person would be depressed, anxious, or addicted to something.  Not only is there no brain scan, blood test, genetic test, or other objective test mental health professionals use to diagnose mental health conditions,  Later he learned that the evidence does not support the brain-based theory of psychological distress either.  

Tyler Mostul PMHNP does not see depression, anxiety, mania, addiction, hearing voices, or seeing visions as some kind of brain disease or as “insane.” Instead he sees them as sane ways of relating to and coping with a person’s often insane world.  Acknowledging this has the potential to provide some relief as we open up to being more gentle and compassionate with ourselves. Discovering new ways of relating to our insane world also has this potential. He hopes to explore these possibilities with his clients.

Tyler Mostul PMHNP is accepting new patients. Call Pohala for an appointment today (503) 572-4196

 

The Courage to Heal with Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster

Last night met by my endearing Anthroposophic colleagues 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️ who travelled to stay with me, then to wake up at 4am and travel to New York for a week of training.

One theme is to discuss the Courage 🦁 to Heal. I think it relates to…

1. What does it mean as a Healer to show up for a person to invite a space for healing to happen?

2. How can patients too have the Courage to stand in the face of anything and be brave enough to Heal?

What healing means to one person can mean something else to another. 🌸

We will cover topics for women’s health, chronic illness, and one of my favorite teachings on the Alchemy of the 7 Sacred Metals for healing. All of this in the context of holistic medicine.

Did you know that the word Anthroposophy means Human in Divine Wisdom? And furthermore the Divine Sophia (Feminine) Wisdom. Why does that matter? When we can know ourselves and be guided in such a higher force of Divine Wisdom then we may become or see our full human potential.

Anthroposophy gives me a lens to view the cosmos and all its facets for healing. We focus on what makes us healthy (salutogenesis). Out of this true healing is possible. My practice is guided in part by these approaches.

🌈🔱

– Julie Foster

 

What is the Difference Between Unipolar Depression and Bipolar Depression?

Pohala Client Julie A. Fast writes about the differences between unipolar and bipolar depression for Health Central online. 

 

Depression is Complex

All human brains can experience depression, but there is more than one kind of depression. The most common depression is situational where a person goes through a downswing due to a life experience. This depression can often be treated by therapy that is specific to the event, such as grief counseling. In contrast, unipolar and bipolar depression are considered genetic, medical conditions. They often occur without a life experience trigger and usually need a more medical than therapy-based treatment approach.

Unexpected Symptoms of Unipolar and Bipolar Depression

Depression is often described as weepy, sad, and hopeless, but this is only one type of depression. The other depression, irritated depression, is angry, negative, and complaining. People with irritated depression often go untreated as they are considered bitchy, rude, or negative. Irritated depression can manifest in road rage, punching and kicking tires and walls, yelling and statements, such as “I hate everyone! Leave me alone!” Both unipolar and bipolar depression can either be the typical weepy depression or irritated depression.

What is the Difference between Unipolar and Bipolar Depression?

There are two genetic mood disorders: unipolar depression and bipolar disorder. Bipolar includes the mood swings bipolar depression and bipolar mania. Unipolar depression and bipolar depression share the same symptoms with three main differences: 1) Bipolar depression is more episodic than unipolar, 2) Bipolar depression is always on the edge of mania, and 3) Due to the mania risk, bipolar depression treatment is different than unipolar depression treatment.

Click here to read the rest of the article from Julie A. Fast on Health Central.com.

More bipolar disorder related blogs: Steroids, Allergies and Bipolar Disorder: Q&A with Portland Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster

Genetic and Neurotransmitter Mental Health Testing in Portland, Oregon by Julie Foster

Should I have Genetic or Neurotransmitter testing for psychiatric or mental health medications?

As a healthcare professional it is always my goal to carefully determine what medications work with specific patients. My clients who have depression, anxiety, bipolar, or schizophrenia all have different medication needs. Genetic testing give me another tool to get the medications right from the beginning.

Whether you have a new mental health diagnosis or a chronic mental health condition, testing for  the genetic predispositions for medications and knowing neurotransmitter levels is incredibly helpful when making a decision about medications.

Pohala offers genetic and neurotransmitter testing for mental health to all patients who request the process.

Many insurances are now covering this testing.

We offer testing from companies such as Admera, Genesight, and ZRT.

Let’s get to the bottom of your healthcare needs!

Julie Foster FNP