Can Acupuncture Help with Pain? Ask the Dr. with Paresh Shelat of Pohala Clinic in Portland, Oregon

By Dr. Paresh H. Shelat, Naturopathic Physician and Licensed Acupuncturist at Pohala Clinic in Portland, OR. 

In my clinical opinion, absolutely.  Both acute and chronic pain account for a billion dollar industry. With many different therapeutic modalities and approaches to reduce pain, and subsequent disability resulting from pain, what are patients left to do? Ideally, INQUIRE and be CURIOUS. After all, it’s the job of any healthcare provider to inform patients of their treatment options and to educate them about pain and what it means to have pain so that we can come up with a healthy plan that reduces pain without adding the complications of medication side effects. In doing so, both the provider and patient can formulate a healthy plan that reduces pain without adding the potential complications of medication side effects.

The most common pain-related conditions I see in practice include:

    1. Low Back Pain: A majority of people have low back pain at some point in their life.  It’s also the most common musculoskeletal pain.
    2. Neck Pain / Mid-Back Pain.
    3. Shoulder Pain / Rotator Cuff Injuries.
    4. Knee Pain: Resulting from both acute injury or more systematic / degenerative problems such as osteoarthritis or autoimmune disease.
    5. Muscle Strains / Muscle Cramps.

What are the most common treatment options or treatment recommendations I typically see primary care providers use? Please note that there is nothing inherently wrong with the treatments in the list below. This is simply what I normally see in general health care and there is no question that they have their place in a pain management plan. My goal is to show a client all of his or her options.

    1. Pharmacologic Medications: NSAIDS, Muscle Relaxers, Opioids etc.
    2. Physical Therapy.
    3. Osteopathic / Chiropractic Care.
    4. Massage Therapy.

Why I add acupuncture to my list:

Acupuncture is the least invasive process I have found to help with acute and chronic pain.  Patients often don’t know to ask for acupuncture and are often surprised that insurance can cover the treatment depending on a person’s plan.

Acupuncture helps to reduce or minimize medications altogether as well as enhance other manual based therapeutic modalities such as physical therapy and massage. Why not try acupuncture first? It makes sense for anyone who wants a cost effective, natural treatment for pain. 

How Does Acupuncture Help Reduce Pain? 

Pain is multifactorial and spans across all aspects of healthcare: spiritual health, emotional health, mental health, physical health, and perhaps most importantly, our cognitive understanding of pain ( what it means to have pain.)  Additionally, lifestyle factors greatly impact pain and include: diet, self-care measures, cultural values, family, and external stressors of all kinds (e.g. relationships, finances, home, etc). 

Let me expand on this by briefly discussing my views on the western and eastern philosophy of acupuncture.

    • The Western Paradigm / Model: By introducing a novel stimulus (e.g. acupuncture) to the site of injury, we can impart change on the autonomic nervous system.  More precisely, we are able to provide the brain with information that is non-harmful and non-threatening. This in turn will change, and hopefully decrease, the output of pain by the brain.
    • The Eastern Paradigm / Model: Our body’s are made up of energy channels (e.g. meridians) that run up and down our body. These energy channels correspond to organs and organs systems (e.g stomach channel).  Acupuncture allows us to engage these energetic streams by needling (applying a very thin needle) specific locations to unblock and/or correct disrupted flow that may lead to pain syndromes. Furthermore, acupuncture provides us the opportunity to correct multiple imbalances at once while simultaneously supporting health on a multitude of levels as mentioned above.

Is Acupuncture Right For You?

There are times when more interventional based treatments are required (e.g. surgery) due to the extent of tissue injury.  The importance of proper evaluation (history and physical exam) cannot be over-emphasized.  By combining appropriate evaluation with physician-patient dialogue (e.g. education), often times, many patients can reduce recovery times of acute injuries, avoid unnecessary imaging, as well as reduce and significantly improve chronic pain syndromes. 

I would recommend each and every single patient to talk to a healthcare practitioner knowledgable about Chinese Medicine and how it can be integrated into your standard healthcare regimen. 

Perhaps, the most important decision you make is whether you allow yourself to be open-minded about the possibility of new ways to reduce pain and improve mobility.  I urge you to ask questions. I implore you to allow yourself the opportunity to become educated about pain. This is the first step to achieving your goals of having NO PAIN. 

In my practice at Pohala Clinic in Portland, OR, and given my background in naturopathic medicine and Chinese Medicine, I use a combination of treatment modalities to help my clients who have pain. These include but are not limited to: acupuncture, botanical medicine, homeopathy, nutraceuticals, naturopathic manipulative techniques, manual therapy, and much more! 

If you would like to learn more about ways in which you can reduce your pain, please schedule a visit at Pohala Clinic in Portland, OR. I look forward to learning more about you.

Chronic Pain Management with Julie Foster Nurse Practitioner in Portland, Oregon

Pohala Clinic Client Julie A. Fast talks about working with Julie Foster for chronic pain management help.

“Managing chronic pain is more than medications. It’s about lifestyle changes and helping a person find natural ways to exercise and work with the pain in order to have a functional life.” 

 

I’ve worked with nurse practitioner Julie Foster as my primary care physician in Portland, Oregon for over ten years. During this time, she has helped me through a variety of sport related injuries that eventually led to a problem with chronic pain.  With her help, I have regular body treatments from various processionals,  have worked on my diet and eventually got my pain under control.  Julie’s advice is always specific. We talk about sleep and natural treatments. We use homeopathic remedies and acupuncture and well.

 

She reminds me that what I put in my body will be reflected in how my body responds to injuries. I know this and am working on it daily.

I want to share my story with others who are looking for help with chronic pain so that they can hopefully work with Julie in finding a plan that works in all areas of life.

Chronic pain is with me daily. I know that without my own way of dealing with the ups and downs of energy I experience depending on my pain levels, I will have a tough time in life.

 

Do You Need Help with Chronic Pain? 

We all need a plan to help us get on with life, even when the pain makes it difficult to get out of bed. I consider myself half way through this journey of getting my body back to where it was before I had my biking accident. This is something I love about working with Julie Foster. She gives me time. There is no judgement when I tell her I’m still having trouble with sugar and there is always a celebration when I am able to better follow her advice. Her patience with me has allowed me to find help for chronic pain that got me out of my special anti gravity chair and back in the world.

 

Julie taught me that chronic pain can have a life of its own. I need to be aware of what is real in my body and what is being created by my overloaded brain.  Julie often says, “The body and mind often trade off. The mind gives us trouble and when we have this figured out, the body then sends us a message that there is still more work to do. Eventually, balance happens when the mind and the body are healthy at the same time.”

 

This is my goal. Julie allows me to be human.  When I am not able to follow the diet in a way that I know will help, she reminds me that the next day is another chance to make better choices. This has allowed me to learn more about what I need. My weight has stabilized and I am now working on finding an eating plan that helps with the pain in general. This includes the following:

 

  1. Night shades such as tomatoes and chili peppers cause an immediate flare in my body. Stopping my favorite Mexican and Thai dishes has not been easy, but for now, I am very conscious of my night shade intake and it is helping greatly.

2. Movement. Chronic pains tells us that we can’t move. This is rarely the case. Even someone like myself with multiple injuries can move.

3.  White sugar.  Julie once said to me, “Julie, the fat that is created on the body from sugar consumption becomes its own organ. It can become yet another source of pain.”  When I am free from white sugar, even for a week, my pain levels go down greatly.

4. Medication pain management.  My goal is to be pain medication free.  To do this, I continue to work with Julie and the other practitioners in my life who are helping me change my diet and work on my specific injuries.

Without Julie, this would be too overwhelming. With her, I am reminded that I can get my body healthy again. It takes a team and Julie is an important part of that team.

 

 

Julie A. Fast

 

To book a time with Julie Foster or one of our Pohala Practitioners, please call the Pohala Clinic and let the receptionist know that Julie A. Fast referred you!

 

How Does Acupuncture Help Knee Pain


Knees are particularly susceptible to pain and injury. They are a joint we often take for granted until they no longer work optimally or feel healthy. Maintaining knee health is essential as we age. Take care of your knees today through acupuncture.

Acupuncture can help ease and eliminate both chronic and acute pain. Acupuncture helps increase circulation and decrease inflammation by stimulating local acupuncture points at the knees. Distal points (other points on the body) can also be used if the knees are inaccessible.

Stimulating distal acupuncture points helps move Qi along the channels involving the knees, keeping it flowing properly through the joint.

Distal points also help address underlying conditions that lead to knee pain.

Maila Susee,
Acupuncturist

Visit our Pohala Clinic contact page to schedule an appointment with Malia

The Creatures that Live in Our Bodies from Vera Vos, Family Nurse Practitioner

Vera Voss

by Vera Vos

One of the most fascinating and significant biological discoveries of this century is that we are not alone in our bodies.

Human bodies are made up of approximately 37.2 trillion cells. There is an estimated 100 trillion microorganisms (single celled creatures) that live on and within us, about 3 times more cells than our own bodies! Whole ecosystems of microorganisms live in every part of our body – skin, brain, liver, lungs, etc. The ecosystem that gets most talked about is our gut microbiome (the collection of microorganisms that inhabit our gut), which when all dumped together on a scale weighs about 2 Kg and consists of at least 1,000 species of bacteria, not to mention viruses, fungi, protozoa and archaea. Two thirds of our gut microbiome is unique to us as an individual, like our finger print.

Why is this such a big deal? We still have lots to learn but all the microorganisms in our body and, maybe, especially our gut microbiome have a huge influence on our health. They are major contributors to digestion and largely responsible for extracting nutrients from food. They spearhead the production of certain vitamins like B and K and play a major role in immune function. The surprising thing is how much influence they have on today’s most common disease processes.

Due to changes in our food supply and other factors, certain strains of microorganisms are increasingly common in the human gut and may be associated with weight gain and obesity, cancers, autoimmune disorders, and mental health, especially depression, anxiety and autism.

Considering obesity is associated with increased risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, some cancers, arthritits, and many other chronic diseases, the unique make-up of our own gut microbiome is very significant to our health.

So how do we maximize the health of our gut microbiome, and, coincidentally our own health? Obviously eating a healthy diet is most important. I recommend 70-80% or more of our diet be whole plants – vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds and whole grains. Buying organic, local and seasonal or growing your own is probably best and adding lots of fresh herbs and spices, wild mushrooms and fermented foods creates a favorable gut environment for healthy microbes. There are more non-gluten grains available than ever before and sprouted, organic wheat products may be tolerable for those sensitive to wheat gluten.

If you would like to learn a whole lot more about how our microbiome influences our health and how to cultivate a microbiome that helps us thrive, check out the program below:

Click here to watch a video on how we are interconnected and the power we have to heal from within.

Please call our Pohala office if you would like to make an appointment to talk about gut health.

Vera

Visit Massage Therapist Tiki Jones at Pohala Clinic in Portland, Oregon

“I believe that ever BODY needs a massage!” 

We welcome our new massage therapy practitioner Tiki Jones, LMT to Pohala Clinic. She recently answered our getting to know you questions from the blog:

What led you to the massage profession?

My love of people and wanting to aid in their healing led me to train and become a licensed massage therapist.

What is your goal as a healthcare professional the first time you see a new client?

My goal the first time I see a client is to directly address the issue they have asked me about before going to the area that may not hurt but is most likely compensating for the hurt/injury. For example, someone may say their shoulder hurts and I will work on that area and also on the antagonist muscles.

What is in your life personally that helps you have a better understanding of your clients?

I have a body that I use! From picking up small children, to sitting at a computer to doing sports. I believe every body needs massage. Especially those bodies that give massage need to receive that healing touch as well.

What is your view on western medicine (allopathic)  v. eastern (naturopathic) medicine?

They go hand in hand. I heard a chiropractor once say, (and I’m paraphrasing here) Allopathic is great when your house is on fire; but you wouldn’t call the fire department to douse your house everyday. Naturopathic is great to maintain your house.

What are your hours?

To start with my hours will be Tuesdays 10am to 3pm. They will increase as need picks up.

Call the Pohala Clinic to book a time for a massage with Tiki.

Tiki Staton Jones

Food and the Sacred by Julie Foster, Nurse Practitioner at Pohala Clinic

 

🍎FOOD and the SACRED🍑

 

The HUMAN of the future will approach plants that are of use to them consciously; not as now when one reflects on what yields the best substances for one’s body; one will then have a vital relationship to every plant, for they will know what it is has absorbed, and what passes from food to them. Eating will not be to one as a means occupation, but an act consummated with SOUL and SPIRIT for one will know that everything they eat is the external form of something SPIRITUAL 💮

In our immediate age, when HUMANS know little about the vital inward relations between themselves and the world, all kinds of substitutes are made use of. Why have the Initiates of all ages urged people to say grace before eating? The grace should be a token of the recognition that, together with the food, something SPIRITUAL enters into HUMAN.

Rudolf Steiner – GA 105 –Universe, Earth and Man – Lecture III – Stuttgart, 6th August 1908

(I changed  the gender pronoun MAN to HUMAN- as Steiner meant this with his original use of the word man.)

Help for Sleep When You Have Bipolar Disorder

Pohala Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster is often asked for quotes regarding her mental health work. Julie was interviewed for the following Health Central slide show on getting better sleep when you have bipolar disorder.

From the article:

Bipolar disorder responds well to a sleep plan that respects the body’s circadian rhythm. Learning to prevent mood swings by making good “sleep hygiene” choices is an inexpensive and natural way to prevent mania and depression. Sleep changes are not always easy in our very busy world, but please know that making even a few of the changes discussed here can reduce the need for certain medications and ultimately prevent mood swings.

Click here to read 9 Tips to Help Sleep With Bipolar. 

Mahalo,

Team Pohala

 

Julie Foster Accepts Executive Committee Chair Position for the Nurse Practitioners of Oregon / Independent Practice Business Owners Group

A note from Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster:

I accepted the Executive Committee Chair position for Nurse Practitioners of Oregon / Independent Practice Business Owners (‘Wow, that is a mouthful) this month.

With our difficult to navigate healthcare system in the United States,  I am passionate about practicing medicine that is personalized and humane. Being in private practice and owning my business for 12 yrs has allowed for freedom around this process. All of the providers at Pohala are also independent providers.

Collectively we share the vision of a healthy planet with healthy people.

When I went out on my own,  I answered an inner calling  and found myself in the position of being a health care provider and an entrepreneur. Many nurse practitioners and natural providers are also in the business of medicine. 

I have learned and grown endlessly. I love medicine and discovering all the ways we HEAL as individuals and as the collective.

Nurse Practitioners are smart, emotionally strong and as warmhearted as needed during the most wrenching life events for those we serve.

This new position with the Nurse Practitioners of Oregon / Independent Practice Business Owners Group allows me to stay in touch with the changes in our health care world.  It is my goal to give back to the community and work with fellow nurse practitioners to create healthy individuals and communities empowered to live into their purpose.

🌺

Julie 

Help from Acupuncture in Portland, Oregon with Malia Susee

 

Pohala Clinic focuses on the whole body experience for every client.  Whether you visit a practitioner for a specific illness, a check up or for chronic pain, our providers specialize in treating the body, mind and the spirit. Acupuncturist Malia Susee embodies this philosophy.

If this is your first time with an acupuncturist, Malia explains the philosophy behind her work and how she came to practice the ancient healing and chi balancing technique.

I have always had a love of language, learning, and travel. Along with this, I harbor a fascination with the human body’s anatomy, physiology, and energetic potential. I was a student of martial arts and yoga when my yoga teacher invited me to become her apprentice. She suggested I take a course in Anatomy and Physiology first– and when I did, “my hair caught fire,” (not really, but I became utterly engrossed!). I had received acupuncture on many occasions and found it helpful and curative. I realized that I could make this my life’s work. Once I looked into the education and practice of Oriental Medicine, I never looked back!

Visiting Malia is a relaxing and expanding experience. For those used to acupuncture, taking the pulse, looking at the tongue and asking questions about behaviors of the body will be natural. But when it’s your first time, it can feel like a new world. One filled with possibilities and healing.  Seeking the natural approach to a healthy mind and body is one process Malia loves sharing with her clients. Her goal as a health care professional is to actively listen and work with a person to find out a plan that helps the body find balance, healthy internal function and freedom from pain. She continues, “I want to understand what my patient is experiencing and wants to achieve, health-wise, and to use Traditional Chinese Medicine to not only develop a treatment plan, but to start treatment, on the table, at that visit.”

Malia treats many people who have chronic pain along with joint and muscle dysfunction, but she also has deep clinical experience addressing a patient’s hormonal and emotional imbalances, addictions, respiratory illnesses, strokes, concussions and traumatic injuries.

Malia is available for appointments at Pohala clinic on Monday through Thursday. Please call the Pohala Clinic office for her schedule.

Malia loves the challenge of helping people reach their health goals through balancing the energy of the body and the mind.  Acupuncture provides relief for menopause hot flashes, anxiety, insomnia, addiction, colds, stroke, concussions, traumatic injuries, migraines, cramps and more.

Visit Malia and learn about acupuncture and how it can help you find relief and the health needed to live a stable and happy life.

Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder and Cannabis: An Interview with Portland Nurse Practitioner Julie Foster

Julie Foster, nurse practitioner at Pohala Clinic in Portland, Oregon was recently interviewed by writer Lisa Ellis for PsyCom.net on the topic of medical marijuana, psychosis and schizophrenia. As more states and countries legalize cannabis, it’s essential that all sides of the marijuana story are told. What helps many can also cause unwanted and difficult to mange symptoms in others.  Julie addresses this topic in the article Medical Marijuana for Schizophrenia: Weighing the Risks and Benefits. 

Article excerpt:

“As medical marijuana becomes legal in more states, experts fear it will be used to treat more conditions although data is lacking and health could be harmed. But when it comes to schizophrenia, is cannabis safe, even if it is “medical”?

A growing number of people today are turning to medical marijuana (also called medical cannabis) to manage a host of health problems. But for those with schizophrenia,  a chronic brain disorder that causes periods of psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, and trouble focusing, marijuana—in any form—can actually worsen the symptoms, according to Julie Foster, a family nurse practitioner who also serves as Medical Director of Pohala Clinic, a center for integrative care and alternative medicine approaches located in Portland, Oregon.

That’s why she and many other experts recommend that people with schizophrenia or a tendency toward psychosis steer clear of all forms of marijuana.

What is Marijuana?

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Thank you,

Pohala Team